How Radon Effects Health

Many people are aware of the dangers of texting while driving: it is dangerous, distracting, and has the potential for deadly consequences.

Smoking is another well-known risk, with a significant chance of developing lung cancer (among other health problems).

While most are aware of the connection between smoking and lung cancer, one thing many may not think of is the danger of radon exposure. Because the gas is imperceptible to us, it is easy to put the risk in the back of our minds. However, that does not change the fact that people and animals are at risk whenever they breathe in radon. The higher the amount of radon, and the longer the exposure over time, the higher the risk.

Since the risks of texting while driving are so well known, it can be surprising to find that more Canadians die from lung cancer caused by radon than from texting while driving accidents. Even though this is the case, only 6% of Canadians have tested for radon within their homes (source: Statistics Canada).

When you combine that with being a smoker, your risk goes up even higher:

  • With a lifetime of radon exposure at 200 Bq/m3, a non-smoker has a 1% chance of being diagnosed with lung cancer; that risk goes up to 5% at 800 Bq/m3.
  • A smoker, on the other hand, has a 12% and whopping 33% chance for a lung cancer diagnosis at those same levels, respectively.

It is easy to see the impact radon can have on your health and the health of those you love. It is critical to test for it in your home, and fortunately, the process is simple and high levels can be corrected.

This holistic approach includes being with you every step of the way, from the initial consultation and assessment down to follow-up after the installation. You can count on us to clearly explain each step of the process and answer all of your questions.